Charles Spurgeon” “Well, I am going to mend myself,” says one: “I have taken the pledge, and I am going to be honest, and chaste, and religious.” This is commendable resolving, but what will come of it? You will break your resolutions, and be nothing bettered by your attempts at reform. I expect that if you go into the business of mending yourself, you will be like the man who had an old gun, and took it to the gunsmith, and the gunsmith said, “Well, this would make a very good gun if it had a new stock, and a new lock, and a new barrel.” So you would make a very good man by mending, if you had a new heart, and new life, and were made new all over, so that there was not a bit of the old stuff left. It will be easier, a great deal, depend upon it, even for God to make you new, than to mend you; for the fact is that “the carnal mind is enmity against God,” and is not reconciled to God, neither, indeed, can be; so that mending will not answer; you must be made anew. “Ye must be born again.” What is wanted is that you should be made a new creature in Christ Jesus. You must be dead and buried with Christ, and risen again in him; and then all will be well, for he will have made all things new. I pray God to bless these feeble words of mine for the helping of some of his chosen out of the darkness of their fears.”

– C.H. Spurgeon
Sermon for New Year's Day, 1885